In the magazine this month

September 2014

As long as the Western world refuses to join the ideological dots between strains of Islamism, the jihadis will never be defeated
Over-analysing and under-analysing — are these not the two sins of thought which we are all meant to avoid? Believing a sniffle is a presage of imminent death. Not bothering about a pain in the chest. Thinking all the problems of the world are easy to solve. Deciding that most things are too difficult to solve. Over-thinking and under-thinking are the Scylla and Charybdis between which we all navigate. But there is one challenge at this moment in particular which the world would do well to understand a bit better and over-think a bit less. Our future depends on it.
JOHN WARE
Two reports confirm the worst allegations about a ‘Trojan Horse' plan to impose an intolerant Islamic ethos on British state schools
MICHAEL NAZIR-ALI
From Syria and Iraq to Iran and Pakistan, Christians and other minorities are being persecuted by Islamists. Can they be stopped?
KATHARINE BIRBALSINGH
Michael Gove was hated because people prefer the bigotry of low expectations to fixing Britain's education system. But he was right
 
IAIN MARTIN
Political elites have yet to grasp that voters will soon demand protection from the harsh impact of the Second Machine Age
MARINA GERNER
Social media will not set us free — but neither will they enslave us. New means of communication depend on people using them responsibly
TIM CONGDON
The Continent is stuck on a course of ‘ever closer union'. British voters need to know what the Prime Minister thinks of such a vision
 
DAVID P GOLDMAN
Europe was the great engine of invention in the 19th century, the US in the 20th. But can they keep up with their 21st century competito?
WILLIAM NORTON
Has the fashionable French economist thought through his radical proposals? Crunch the numbers and you see the damage they'd do
NORMAN LEBRECHT
Eighty years old this month, the Canadian singer and songwriter has always been proud to be a Jew first and last — as his songs reveal
 
LAURA FREEMAN
Abram Games's eye for clean graphic images transformed the world of posters and his art lives on in the London Underground today